Rankable Ep.13 – How to Effectively Identify Your Target Audience

Welcome to Ep.13 of Rankable, we are joined by Holly Miller Anderson to discuss the topic "How to Effectively Identify your Target Audience."

Rankable - How to Effectively Identify Your Target Audience

Welcome to episode 13 of iPullRank’s Rankable podcast, where we discuss various hot topics in the digital marketing industry.

In this episode, we are joined by Holly Anderson to discuss the topic “How to Effectively Identify Your Target Audience.”

Being able to accurately identify your target audience is crucial to your marketing process. In this episode, the discussion revolved around how to identify the right audience and what you should do as marketers after you have identified them.

A lot of great insights were shared in this episode, be sure to check it out!

Video Transcription

Jarrett Thomas: 

Hey, good afternoon, everybody. We are back. Thank you again for joining rankable episode 13. Topic today is “How to effectively identify your target audience.” As always, I’m your host, Jarrett Thomas, Senior Account Executive from iPullRank. I’m joined by two special guests, actually a co-host. My partner in sales, Michael Dellon.

Michael Dellon:

How are you doing guys!

Jarrett Thomas: 

And we are also joined by a very special guest, Holly Miller Anderson.

Holly Miller Anderson:

Hello everyone!

Jarrett Thomas: 

For those who are not familiar with Holly. So she brings a breadth of experience to this conversation today. So what we want to do is really discuss how to effectively identify your target audience. And Holly, as you know, she’s a seasoned SEO strategist, she worked at agencies, B2B, B2C brands that help them grow and accelerate their SEO strategies, and also work with startups. And most recently with in house SEO, product manager at macys.com and Bloomingdale’s.

So our main goal today, for those first time joining. So rankable is just our own platform where we basically have other digital marketers come to the platform and really discuss things that are happening in the industry. Try to give you tips and tricks that you can hopefully implement into your own business strategies and then take it from there. So our main goal today is really just to showcase the importance of how to accurately identify your target audience for any business and how it really can impact other aspects of your business. 

I’m also going through the process of how to identify a target audience lookalikes from the perspective of Mike and Holly. And then we also identify the right target audience, once you identify that target audience, what are the steps you should take from there? So let’s start with the top of the topic. Would love to hear from you both. So how do you effectively identify your target audience? What are some of the things that you look at and want to identify when you’re looking at the audience.

Holly Miller Anderson:

Sure. Um, Michael, can I go first?

Michael Dellon:

Yea, please!

Holly Miller Anderson:

Awesome. So I come at this from two different perspectives. From the SEO perspective and from the marketing perspective. I’ve been in both roles, but I think it’s interesting to bring that to the table and talk about those two components, right? So you’ve got keyword research where SEO is taking a look and they see who is looking, you know, for X term, how many times per month, uh, you can do your keyword research whenever you want, you know, quarterly basis, seasonally, whatever works for you. 

But there’s also the marketing focus where you can say, okay, we’re going to take a, you know, an age range or household income or demographics, psychographic information. And that’s kind of more of the persona building that marketing takes as an approach. And I think looking at those two and really putting those together is the key to actually finding the right audience. And Michael, I’ll let you jump in real quick before I go on about my rant about audience and age ranges.

Michael Dellon:

Yeah, absolutely. I think that what you’re saying is a really important thing to kind of understand is that you have two different pillars of audience research, but the key to audience strategy is actually combining those two different areas into your personas. So not only are you understanding what the keywords are that specific personas might be searching for but also where they’re at in the buyer’s journey. 

And on top of that, really what they’re looking for in terms of what keywords are searching for. And on top of that, where they’re actually going to be looking for information and what kind of information they want to see and how that information is going to be portrayed to them. 

So I really enjoyed kind of hearing about taking those two and combining them. In your opinion, Holly, just real quickly, like how do you think is a great way to make sure that you’re taking your findings from the SEO approach and from the marketing approach and combining them into something that you can use for strategy.

Holly Miller Anderson:

So I’m always looking at keyword research as, you know, the way that we prioritize what we should be focused on in terms of what our actual audience is looking for. You want to make sure that you are solving the right problems that you’re touching on the right pain points. So I look to see what people are searching for that is their pain point that they’re trying to solve. And then backing that into, you know, kind of awareness, like the top of funnel content, the mid funnel. 

And then you’re like, okay, we’re ready. This is product level information we’re ready to actually buy. You know, when you, when you just look broadly at audiences, you know, with an age range, you know, a male 25 to 40 years old, you know, married, it’s like, just stop because it’s so broad, it’s so broad and it doesn’t help you as a marketer or as someone leading product to really understand what someone within that age range is actually looking for.

And my real thing about that is like, let’s just turn that on its head and, and really look into five year increments. You know, let’s look at someone who’s, 25 to 30, then 30 to 35 and then 35 to 40 and take those respectively, because I think they’ll be a lot more effective. Um, you know, someone who is 25 is very different. They’re in a different head space, they’re in a different life stage than someone who, I mean, hopefully that’s not a failure to launch, but like 35, between 35 40, like that, you’re just, you’re completely different tax bracket, different earning income. 

You know, maybe you’ve moved around a bit, like it’s just one of those things where marketers can no longer afford to just kind of paint with that broad brush and be like, yeah, it’s like this age range and, you know, and women, you know, 20 to 40 need this skincare.

And you’re like, my skin was very different in my twenties, as opposed to now, you know, and I can spend, you know, differently just depending on my own times, blah, blah, blah. So that’s what I think marketers are doing themselves a disservice, like really, uh, really niche down. I think it’s really appropriate to look at a broad scale, you know, and say what’s sort of the broad customer base here, but if you really want to be effective and find that audience that is, that can spend with you, that you know, that you want to talk to and nurture and spend your time on and develop, um, you need to really get specific. 

And I would say like, you know, five years is a good amount of time to really get the details, right. So that the right, you know, the right talking points, you can address them in the right channels. You can find them, you can talk to them about how your product actually fits into their lifestyle or solves, you know, the problem that they’re searching for.

Michael Dellon:

Yeah, and I think that’s such a good point because I feel that a lot of times marketers, when they’re doing this type of research, they kind of take the personal aspect out of the equation. And the fact of the matter is, is that if you think of yourself as someone who could potentially be buying this product, and you think about where you were as a 25 year old versus a 45 year old, there should be a little light bulb that goes off in your head saying that there’s a huge difference. 

So really taking a step back and kind of understanding, how you, the consumer would view these different personas and how accurate they might actually be based on things like age ranges is something that a lot of people tend to forget. But I wanted to kind of ask this question, cause I’m also a little bit curious with this huge digital shift that we’re seeing right now with coronavirus, where people can even really go out and shop like they used to, my thought here would be that these wider age ranges actually might hold a lot more value in that people let’s call it 65 years old.

Maybe they weren’t the first people to shop online, but now they’re kind of being forced to, how do you kinda think about that? And as a marketer, how do you guys prepare for a shift like this or react to a shift like this so that you’re understanding these new personas and the new way people are buying right now?

Holly Miller Anderson:

Yeah, absolutely. I think everyone, how long did we spend on like, you know, mobile first and, you know, like it’s the age of mobile and Madonna, how long did we spend on that? It’s like digital is here to stay. Um, and for people that are new to the channel that are older, I think what has really struck me the most during this pandemic and during the shift to almost everyone having to do their search and online is empathy. 

Brands really need to have a lot more empathy for how people find them, how they want to interact with them. So, you know, probably the best example is restaurants, you know, these days, I’m sure a lot of people are used to online shopping and getting things done on Amazon.

But when you’re maybe looking to order food or ask, you know, restaurants notoriously do not have great websites for their ordering. But when you look at, uh, people that want to transact with you and, you know, they might want to call and say, well, I have this peanut allergy, or how do I make sure that the food’s going to be safe or how was it delivered? You know, what’s your, what’s your cleanliness process right now? Uh, do I come pick it up? Do you deliver it to me? Is there an extra fee? 

So there’s so much more that businesses have to really think through to empathize with the customer and really help them understand, like, how do you, how can I help you be more comfortable with the process of doing the business with us and just that full communication, you know, soup to nuts.

But like that’s the biggest thing is that I think businesses for too long, relied on people, just walking in browsing, you know, and spending money with them. And it’s like, you know what? Everybody has options. And everyone has different comfort levels as well. Like, you know, my husband and I have only been dining outdoors only. And it’s like, I was never skittish, but like, if we go into a restaurant and there’s, you know, it’s crowded or I’m like, Nope, no, no, no. You know, like we’re, we’re getting out. 

And so it’s like, tell me in your website or in your Google my business, that you have outdoor patio seating, you know, that your capacity is X or, you know, your hours are gestured or what have you like, but bring that out because that’s what I’m searching for as a customer who actually will take a chance and come out and spend money and, you know and be comfortable enough to sit outside. 

But yeah, that’s what it takes is figuring out what your customers are comfortable with, or at least just articulating to the fullest effect of what you are doing as a business, on your website, your social media, just, you know, all the channels that you have, communicate, be empathetic and tell how you’re navigating your business at this time.

Jarrett Thomas: 

I think that’s a perfect vertical that you brought up, right? Restaurants. But like you said, most restaurants don’t have a good website, right? They focus on you coming in, you get the energy, the vibe, you know, we’ll do your website, we’ll do all that good stuff, Google my business pages updated. But I think the ones that adapt, right? Because like you said, once we have that content on a page, right? What are we doing for outdoor seating, right? What is the capacity, right? How are we cleaning our facilities, right? Have we changed anything to our menu? 

And then it’s even more important for a restaurant. Why would I want you to go to GrubHub? Why would I want them to get an extra cut out of my revenue? They think savvy now is like how good a user experience for my customer that will be to a delivery, in person, things like that. So anybody who was in the restaurant field, think about that, right? There’s a huge opportunity for you to separate yourself from the pack and create that whole experience digitally that could work via business. 

Michael Dellon:

Absolutely. And one thing I would want to add is, you know, there’s a step further than I think that you can be taking, especially once you understand who your audience is, is to then go ahead and educate your audience. So not shove products or details in their face. But if you’re one of the few places that has this absolutely unbelievable outdoor dining experience, then you want to be explaining why this outdoor dining experience is the way that it is and why this is different and why you should choose something like whatever this hypothetical restaurant may be able to offer. 

So, it’s fans everywhere. Like, for example, if you’re in e-commerce, uh, maybe you want to teach people about the length of shorts that you’re wearing during the summer. Hypothetically, if we weren’t all working from home and we had the need for a shorts, like a conversation I’ve had in the past, it’s about like short length and how people don’t necessarily know what the best short length is for them specifically, everyone has a different body shape and, you know, you can see seven inches and you’re like, Oh, that’s the perfect length for me. But in reality, it looks like you’re wearing a Speedo. 

So understanding your audience persona and really who they are and what kind of information is going to bring them back onto your website, it’s going to really help in moving them from awareness down to the purchase area. And I think that if you’re continuing to educate your customers, they’re continuing to use you as a source of information and they’re valuing your input a lot higher, which will then cause them to hopefully purchase down the end. 

So I think that whole education is something that a lot of people kind of overlook, but you should really be trying to educate every single one of your personas to help move them down towards a potential sale. 

Jarrett Thomas: 

Absolutely. You know my line, teach them how to fish, then they’ll buy fishing poles, right? You don’t have to sell, you don’t have to just keep on throwing products at them, just, you know, deliver what they want. Right. I think Holly hit it the best earlier when she was talking about the keywords and how you map it to the intent and understand where they are in the buyer’s funnel. So you can personalize content, which creates a better user experience. And I’d love to learn from you Holly, like, what are some of the tools that you use in order to get this information? And then once you do get this, what are some ways that you’re actually implementing it across your entire marketing team?

Holly Miller Anderson:

I love it. I’ve got two and, and one that I’ll touch on first is from my time when I was at Macy’s, uh, listening to customer phone calls is key. SO big. Like we, as a group, our VP of product would bring us in and we’d have a couple of the customer service phone calls that had come in and you could hear the pain the customer was going through and they’re like, but my car is just, it’s not loading, just something’s going on right now. Or like, I thought this was the discount and now it’s not working. 

And so I think day to day, when we’re looking at our own website, we’re kind of blind to some of those things that are going on. And so if you actually have customer data that you can tap into, do it. Because that’s going to be, I think the biggest thing, you know, when you really put yourself in someone else’s shoes and you listen to what they’re going through, maybe you can’t recreate the problem as they were seeing it at the time, but you can start to really understand like, Oh, maybe we need to carry over, you know, the information onto the last page so that, you know, they they’ve got all that information in their cart.

Maybe there’s something better that we can do with explaining the actual product itself, the quantity or whatever, but those are the things that you really start to hear and see when you listen to what real customers are going through when they’re just trying to transact. And so that’s an insight that I got from the product side, listening to your customers.

And the second piece is coming from the consulting side, when I get a chance to work with different companies, you know, on their challenges, I’ve really enjoyed SparkToro, which is Rand Fishkin’s new product. Shoutout to Rand and happy birthday to his wife as well. So Rand’s got this awesome tool and it’s one of those things where, I mean, he’s opened it up, so you get like 10 free searches or something a month right now.

But you can go in and it’s an audience insight tool. So basically if you think about, you know, if you’re someone that maybe you like RV, you know, and doing little road trips and kind of take in your family, what else, you know, what else could you be interested in, where else would you be online? Like, what videos are you watching? What magazines are you potentially subscribing to digitally? Or you know, what other content are you consuming across social, you know, email, television. So, yeah, it’s like, that’s almost to me with an advertising background, that’s like a media plan, you know? So when you start to really look at it and you’re like, okay, what kind of, what is this? Who is this audience? We know we have our product and what we think people, you know, might be interested in, but they’re real people and they have lives and they go out and they do things and they consume other content.

And so wouldn’t it be interesting if they also saw your brand, you know in this episode of, of X or in their feed. And yes, that’s remarketing in a way. But it’s a strategic placement. And so when you start to really know the where. you can start dropping the what, which is your product and your service, and really being relevant to that lifestyle and that receptive side of the consumer when they’re not searching for you, but they see you in another space and another place where they are online.

Michael Dellon:

Yeah. Yeah. I think that’s incredibly important. What you just brought it, the main reason why is because people kind of think of these different digital marketing segments as being totally separate. But it’s important that they all work together, and whether it be social or paid media or organic or email, all of the messaging has to work towards bringing those personas through the buyer’s journey. 

And you know, another great thing to really understand is that eyeballs equal branding success. Every time you can get an eyeball on you, subconsciously people are thinking, oh, this is a brand that they see again. Oh, I’ve seen this brand a couple of times. And the amount of value that comes from just seeing a brand on different channels over and over again, is really almost immeasurable, although I’m sure there’s actually a number for it.

Holly Miller Anderson:

Advertising people are like, Oh, it’s measurable.

Michael Dellon:

Definitely. But, uh, I’m sure everyone can imagine just getting people to see you, whether they’re on Instagram or LinkedIn or in a Google search, or what have you is going to be so powerful in terms of actually bringing up, or bringing about purchases down the road. So really thinking of everything digitally as one actual unit where it’s not siloed out is actually how you create that great messaging across the different channels of digital marketing, and then bring people through that purchase funnel. 

Now, one quick question I have for you, Holly, and I think you might be excited to talk about this is, what’s kind of the relationship that you see between audience and persona research and then, you know, taxonomy within your website?

Holly Miller Anderson:

Yeah. I’m going to nerd out now. Taxonomy just as a concept for everybody out there is what you, it’s the words that you use in your top level navigation on your website. And so, if you’ve kind of traveled abroad, you would know that, Australians use the word, you know, trainers and I think in Europe too, whereas here in the U.S, we use the word sneakers. And so, you know, when you start to look at things from that level, you’re like, okay, are we open to an international audience or do we have a U.S site versus the UK and an Australian site where we want to change that word, because that word is going to resonate differently across the pond and, you know, in different geos.

But you have to realize that people have their own way of looking for things. And I think that’s why SEO is so great. It’s because we can give you that keyword research, you know, and bring this to the merchandising team and across the social teams as well and email, and be like, well not email cause it’s a push channel. Sorry. But you want to be like, here’s what people are looking for. Here’s the way that they’re describing this product, but we’re calling it this, which means getting any traffic to that, you know, that page and that category, because nobody calls it that. It’s like stop being so arrogant as a brand or, you know, if I can for a second and just say, if you want, if you want those sales, you need to speak their language. 

You need to understand your audience, how, when they want to interact with you, where, how, they’re speaking about different things, how they want to solve problems and put that into your navigation, because that’s what we need to really reflect and show that reciprocity of like, I get you, I get this is what you need. And it’s easy to find. And, you know, here it is. It’s not 20 clicks deep in the category that you’d never thought of before. 

So that to me if you can really, I think taxonomy, I think it’s an ongoing thing, especially if, for a company like Macy’s, you know, if you sell clothes or you have seasonality to things, you do need to kind of consider those things as you go, but most companies probably would need a yearly look, you know, a hard look at their tax, I need to say, are we still in the right category? Is this still resonating with people or has the product changed? Do we need to think about the category differently? You know there’s always opportunity out there. And that’s a, I think it’s one of the smaller overlooked aspects of website design, but taxonomy is really going to be a nice win for people. If you can kind of adjust it to the actual audience and what they’re actually looking for.

Michael Dellon:

Definitely. I think that it’s oftentimes a matter of respect in a lot of ways, or just wording things or having things, uh, show up at like, even in your content in a way that speaks to the actual persona that you’re looking to go after. So if you’re a Canadian and an American company and you have two different websites, like it might make sense to at least understand that if they’re going to say color, they spell it with a “u”, like when people are in Canada, they’re going to be looking for that. And it might not be the reason they don’t buy, but it might be that could be a missed opportunity. It could be, because people just want to see that you understand that if you’re operating in a certain market, that you’re actually speaking the way that people there speak.

And I think that that definitely branches into like the content trans creation form of things, which is that, uh, you know, there’s obviously translation where you’re going in and totally editing content to be in a different language. But then there’s also these small little subtleties that are really gonna make a huge difference in the eyes of your consumer, and catering to those and understanding the way people like to be spoke to in different geo regions or the different terminology that they use is so important to have someone in the UK or an Australian market, see a U S product and be like, wow, they actually understand. And no wonder they’re doing well in Australia, they totally have it down. 

So I definitely think that that’s a really good point that you brought up there and you know, back to the whole persona behind it, you know, it does a lot for them to actually see that you’re writing content with them actually in mind. And it really helps in building that brand trust. 

Jarrett Thomas:

Yeah. I actually have a question for you both like, say for instance, I’m an e-commerce brand. I just started out. I don’t have the resources in order to get the SparkToro and other resources and tools, things that help us identify the audience. What would be step one to identifying that audience and what are some things they could do with limited budget or limited resources to do some of the things that we’re discussing now.

Holly Miller Anderson:

So we want the free tools. Is that the secret now?

Jarrett Thomas:

What would you, if you’re starting an eCommerce brand right now, like what would be step one for you?

Holly Miller Anderson:

Yup. I’ve got a great quote for that, but I will jump off and say that, the first thing that you should probably do is check the search engine result pages, you know, type in what you would think would be something that someone would search for with your product and see what comes up. I’ve worked with companies where they have no concept of the fact that people aren’t searching for what they’re trying to solve for. And I’m like, that means you’re creating a new category. 

That’s so much work because you’ve got to market this and you’ve got to tell people about the problem they don’t know they have yet. And that’s a really long haul. And so if you’re just starting out, the more tactical approach, the faster to market is make sure you’re solving a problem people actually have, and yes, you’ll probably have to be competitive against someone else that’s maybe already out there. But that’s your customer research or your competitor research to find out who else is also in this category.

But I’ll pull up the quote that I saw on Twitter today for our tar talk today. This was by April Dunfield and she got it from a quote from an article by Greg Crogan. And that it says category creation is not a shortcut, 88% of B2B startups reach the IPO milestone by marketing themselves in existing categories. So that’s it, right? Like don’t try to solve for a problem that people conceptually, you know, that they don’t actually have, or that is something that is so far down the line that you have to start by the awareness and telling them, you know, realize when you take your shoes off, you’ve got all these microbes underneath your heels and you need to buy this, spray your carpet. And it’s like, no, I just, I want to come in and put my shoes on a rack. And that’s it. 

I mean, so you’re like solve the actual problem that people have, use the language that they have for the pain points that they’re searching for. And that’s the fastest way to market and the fastest way to help people, you know? So don’t waste your time on something that they’ve, that they’re not really looking for yet.

Jarrett Thomas:

Yeah, totally. I heard a quote from Dave Gerhardt who we’re actually going to have on next week, if you guys don’t know, he’s the CMO of Privy, but he said something that was really cool. It just simplified everything. It’s like marketing, your whole goal as a marketer is just to make sales easy. Yeah. So whatever that entails, whether it’s content, whether it’s making sure they have the, you answered the question, right. Whether you’re creating awareness for the brand, wherever you’re doing, right. Just make sales easier. 

And that there is no one size fits all for that, right. Depending on your product, depending on your solution, depending on what channels they’re on and engaging with. But there’s so much opportunity out there. Just understand who your audience is, who your target market is, and who’s going to buy from you. And then you’ll tweak and optimize as you go. The first piece of content might not be a hit. But then you could also repurpose that content. How do you make that into a social post? How do you make that into a video? How do you make that into so many different things? So as a person just starting up, you know, utilize your resources well, and do more with less, right. Understand your audience and just try to make sales easier, whatever way works for you.

Michael Dellon:

And do a SWOT analysis if you really want.

Holly Miller Anderson:

Yeah. That’s free.

Michael Dellon:

Yeah. I mean, you would think that most, if not all new businesses are doing something along those lines, but if you’re not, I mean, the best way to understand where you sit is to do an analysis like that. And then, you know, bring in new findings as you start to build things out. But step one, if you haven’t done it, do a SWOT analysis, it’ll help you in positioning yourself and your company. But with that, it looks like we’re running a little low on time. So I figure we open it up to, does anyone have any questions that we can answer while we’re still here?

Jarrett Thomas:

If so, just feel free to drop it into chat. If you want to, you know, connect with us afterwards, I’ll make sure to send all of our LinkedIns, please make sure you connect with us. You know, we don’t bite. We’re always happy to help you guys. 

Michael Dellon:

Absolutely. And with that, I’ll put my LinkedIn in the chat, if anyone has any questions related to the audience and well, I guess SEO, digital marketing in general, always willing to lend a helping hand and chat a little bit more about it.

Holly Miller Anderson:

Do we have like five more minutes? Can we talk about the LG that we talked about earlier? 

Michael Dellon:

Yeah.

Jarrett Thomas:

I’m going to ask the question real quick. Do you guys want to answer that first? How can we use a tool like GA to identify who your audience is?

Holly Miller Anderson:

How can you use a tool like Google analytics? Um, obviously you should be using GA, that’s one of the free tools that’s out there. You know, one of the best ways is to look at your top landing pages, keywords were taken away a long time ago. So I think you have a level of detail in there, but you probably want to see where people are going, on your site and which pages they’re actually taking a look at and which ones are actually useful. 

You can take bounce rate into consideration. Um, but it depends on what your content, like if you’ve got a page, that’s just, you know, the business name and the address, people are going to bounce from that pretty quickly because they got the information they needed and they’re going to be out.

So take that with a grain of salt, but look at the pages that are your top performing landing pages under your content drill down section, and make sure that people are actually getting what they need when they get to those pages and that they are either, you know, signing up for a newsletter from you or they’re getting to other pages where they can convert and purchase from you. So make sure to kind of evaluate that the pages people are getting to, or the ones that are good for them as a visitor, but also good for you as a business,

Jarrett Thomas:

Which also goes back to the user experience where we were discussing, right? So if you go to a certain landing page and like you said, you see a high bounce rate that could be indicative of you not having the right content there, you’re not answering the right question. Maybe you don’t have enough content on the page. There’s so many different things that you could look at just from GA, but as definitely something that you should be looking at to identify your audience. Understand what pages they’re going to, what is it like and how can you tweak and optimize, and lead them to that conversion. 

Michael Dellon:

Absolutely. And Holly, what was that last topic you want it to go over real quickly? 

Holly Miller Anderson:

Oh, I was going to give the example that we talked about in the green room before we came on. So like a great example of knowing your audience right now is a commercial that, uh, has been hitting our TV lately a lot and it’s by LG. So they make TVs, they make refrigerators. And this particular commercial is for their ice making machine that’s inside of the refrigerator. And it makes these ice like perfect ice balls. So you can put them in the scales. But what I loved about this commercial, you know, and what resonated with me about what we’re talking about here is that this commercial, if you look it up on YouTube, it’s called, I’m gonna make sure, Oh, be a baller.

That’s what it’s called. So if you look it up, be a baller by LG, they have probably like four, three or four different audience groups. Like, so it’ll be the little kids that are putting the ice balls in their chocolate milk. And, you know, a single bachelor who’s, you know, putting it in his scotch or his whiskey, you know, at the end of the night. And it’s like, grandma is dropping the ice balls into her drinks with her lady friends at a red hat club. And it really shows you who, I mean, little kids, aren’t making a purchase for a refrigerator, but they’re probably influencing it and, you know, in some way. 

And so you can have multiple audiences that use the same product and being aware of how they do that. You know, they’re all ballers, so to speak, but you know, but they’re all doing it in their own way and it’s the same product, but each person uses it differently, puts it into a different drink, different cocktail, or what have you, and so that was just, I was like, damn, that is like, that’s knowing your audience. Well done

Jarrett Thomas:

That’s a great part of that. Like, knowing your audience is one thing, but knowing what to expect from him and knowing what to deliver to them is the Holy grail of it. You understand your audience. That was a broad brush. Everybody can use ice, but at the same time, it’s like, how do you make it feel all inclusive? Right. So now if I’m a father, I’m like, okay, my son can use this in milk. I could use this in my whiskey. Her, everybody can use it. It’s a way of selling how they solve the problem in a cool way. 

Holly Miller Anderson:

Yeah. Cool. Oh, I like that with the ice. A “cool” way.

Michael Dellon:

I see what you did there. 

Jarrett Thomas:

I definitely want to thank you again. I really enjoyed the conversation, it was super helpful, and was very informative. And we really appreciate you joining on Rankable episode 13. Thank you. 

Holly Miller Anderson:

Absolutely!

Jarrett Thomas:

We’re going to do another one. We definitely have. We’re going to do another one, but I just want to say thank you to everybody at home. Thank you for all the watchers, the viewers, we’re on episode 13 now because of your support. So we really, really appreciate it. You know, we’re looking forward to more, we have a LinkedIn all-star next week with Dave Gerhardt and then we have another one with David Alpert the next week, who has a business that’s invested by Mark Cuban. So he’s to tell us how to pitch a business to VCs and things like that should be really cool. So we have a great couple of weeks. Thank you all for the continued support and if there is anything we can do to help you guys, please let us know. And thank you again. 

Michael Dellon:

Yeah, thank you guys so much, Holly. Thank you so much as well. Really had a great time chatting with you all today.

Jarrett Thomas:

Perfect. Have a great one. 

Holly Miller Anderson:

Enjoy, bye guys. Thank you!

iPullRank Agency

iPullRank is a digital marketing agency behind Fortune 500s' winning strategies. We are a team of marketing experts who operate by the "PROUD" creed, which stands for being Proactive, Reliable, Outstanding, Useful and Determined. We’re the house that strategic, creative and technical professionals go to learn new strategies, POV's, and to find a competitive edge.
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