Chapter 8

Creating your first customer personas doesn’t have to be complicated, and you can always edit personas if you discover some of the criteria has changed. We’ve created the quickest possible process for creating actionable, data-driven personas.

Here’s what it looks like:

Step 1: Grab your mailing list. Let’s assume that you have a list of potential prospects who have signed up to receive product alerts, news, and promotions from your company.

Step 2: Run it through FullContact.com. If your list has fewer than 1,000 contacts, you can do this by creating a free account. The program’s Person API takes the snippets of information you have about people and companies and returns all the information available online about them.

Step 3: Upload your Twitter contact list to http://demographicspro.com, which is a Neilsen-style measurement for Twitter and Instagram activity. It gives marketers deep insights into the customers who follow specific accounts, post about brands, and influence other users, which is all useful for marketing attribution, too.

Step 4: Upload your list to the Facebook audience insights tool, which allows you to segment it based on demographics and psychographics. With 1.2 billion people on Facebook, it’s an excellent place to do research. You can also use audience insights without having a mailing list.

Step 5: Check the final data against your Google Analytics or any other analytics data you have that provides you with demographics. Then, you can go ahead and start building your personas. Begin with the basic outline or skeleton, and then flesh them out with the insights gleaned from the data.

Working with customer personas that represent your various market segments is a proven way to increase the success of your marketing strategy. For more information on personas or segmentation, contact iPullRank for a consultation.

[1] Schwarzkopf, S., “Turning Trade Marks into Brands: How Advertising Agencies Created Brands in the Global Market Place, 1900–1930” CGR Working Paper, Queen Mary University, London, 18 August 2008

[2] Pruitt, J. and Grudin, J., “Personas: Practice and Theory”

Chapter 8

Creating your first customer personas doesn’t have to be complicated, and you can always edit personas if you discover some of the criteria has changed. We’ve created the quickest possible process for creating actionable, data-driven personas.

Here’s what it looks like:

Step 1: Grab your mailing list. Let’s assume that you have a list of potential prospects who have signed up to receive product alerts, news, and promotions from your company.

Step 2: Run it through FullContact.com. If your list has fewer than 1,000 contacts, you can do this by creating a free account. The program’s Person API takes the snippets of information you have about people and companies and returns all the information available online about them.

Step 3: Upload your Twitter contact list to http://demographicspro.com, which is a Neilsen-style measurement for Twitter and Instagram activity. It gives marketers deep insights into the customers who follow specific accounts, post about brands, and influence other users, which is all useful for marketing attribution, too.

Step 4: Upload your list to the Facebook audience insights tool, which allows you to segment it based on demographics and psychographics. With 1.2 billion people on Facebook, it’s an excellent place to do research. You can also use audience insights without having a mailing list.

Step 5: Check the final data against your Google Analytics or any other analytics data you have that provides you with demographics. Then, you can go ahead and start building your personas. Begin with the basic outline or skeleton, and then flesh them out with the insights gleaned from the data.

Working with customer personas that represent your various market segments is a proven way to increase the success of your marketing strategy. For more information on personas or segmentation, contact iPullRank for a consultation.

[1] Schwarzkopf, S., “Turning Trade Marks into Brands: How Advertising Agencies Created Brands in the Global Market Place, 1900–1930” CGR Working Paper, Queen Mary University, London, 18 August 2008

[2] Pruitt, J. and Grudin, J., “Personas: Practice and Theory”

Before you go...

👋 Sign up for The Rank Report Newsletter

🏆 Loved by over 4000 subscribers who pull rank