Atomic SEO – Click Data Trends Across Verticals

iPullRank teamed up with Botify to present you with the latest update on click data trends and change in consumer behavior in midst of this global pandemic.

Atomic SEO - Click Data Trends Across Verticals

The COVID-19 pandemic changed everything, it has affected almost every aspect of our lives. This of course includes how we as consumers behave, and how we are conducting our online searches.

On this segment of Atomic SEO Live, iPullRank teamed with Botify to bring you the latest update on click data trends across different verticals.

We will be providing a ton of insightful data for you to gain a better perspective on how businesses can pivot and better market to consumers in the age of COVID-19.

We will also be diving deep into real keywords and click data trends for some of the biggest sites on the web across various industries, check out this video to learn more.

Video Transcription

Jarrett Thomas:

Hey, good afternoon everyone. Happy Friday. I’ll be your host this afternoon. It’s Jarrett Thomas, Senior Account Executive at iPullRank and thank you for joining Atomic SEO Live. This is going to be actually a really interesting conversation today. We’re actually honored to have our first guests at Atomic SEO. And for those of who are first time joiners, this is actually something that we’ve created in-house. Mike did this as a continued training for all iPullRank employees and given this situation we thought it’d be really cool to open it up and learn together. 

So we’re honored to have you guys. Thank you for joining us and we’re looking forward to getting started. So let me make my introductions as well. I’m honored to have with us, Director of Content, Kameron Jenkins from Botify. How are you, Kameron!

Kameron Jenkins:

Good. It’s so good to be here. I’m really excited to talk about all this data today.

Jarrett Thomas:

Beautiful, beautiful. And also to the top left if you guys see it like I see it is Michael King, Founder and Managing Director of iPullRank.

Michael King:

Hey, Hey, thanks for having me. I do want to say one quick thing though, I saw Kameron speak for the first time at SearchLove and was completely blown away. So it was really cool to have her on Atomic SEO and sharing her insights and also we have a pretty good relationship with Botify so I’m looking for it to us potentially working together on some content in the near future as well. So super excited to have her here.

Kameron Jenkins:

Oh thank you. Yeah, it was fun to meet you at SearchLove and to talk at the same conference. That was great. And, yeah, I’m really excited to keep working together on this type of thing.

Michael King:

Cool. 

Jarrett Thomas:

Perfect. Perfect. So let’s get into it. I love to start off and go over the topic today. So what we’ll be covering will be clicked data across all the verticals. And Kameron I’d love to start off by asking you, what is the importance of looking at click data as opposed to search volume as we go through these slides?

Kameron Jenkins:

Yeah, for sure. It’s a really good question. We’ve, for example, thought click data would be super interesting because it adds like this level of intent insight that you don’t really get with just keyword volume alone. So the example I keep using is like if someone searches outdoor shoes, we can’t know for sure whether they want to buy outdoor shoes or just research about outdoor shoes. 

That’s why Google responds with like this multi-intent SERP. So with click data we kind of get this extra level of granularity. Like we know if someone clicked search outdoor shoes and clicked on a retail site versus a media site. So that’s kind of the long and short of why we thought flick data was super cool for this.

Jarrett Thomas:

Perfect. That makes complete sense. They’re really just understanding the buyer intent, right? So you know, we don’t want to look at what they’d potentially be looking at, but more so what are they doing when they actually click? Why are they making that purchase? Are they going to other sites? And really just following that behavior and their searches, so im excited to go through the data, we have first upcoming up is how with COVID-19 impacting the travel industry.

Kameron Jenkins:

Yeah, definitely. So, first I wanted to say too, like if you want to see these charts yourself or bookmark it for later, we did put them up on botify.com/trends so just if you want to look at those later. Um, but yeah, travel was like one of the most obvious sectors that’s going to be affected by COVID-19, but there was definitely more than met the eye on this one when you started to dig into the data.

So on the left you can see like a year to date chart and you can see the, obviously things didn’t really start to take a huge hit until after the end of March. That was like the biggest drop-off. In fact, like one thing we thought was super interesting is that interested in booking travel actually kind of shot up a little bit in March.

When we looked closer at that, that was actually people searching for things like, you know, cheap flights, flights to Italy, Italy vacations. And what we thought was happening there was like, before things got super serious and things weren’t shut down, people were trying to capitalize on, like there’s not as much demand so the prices are low. So people were doing a lot of searching for that. 

Obviously after we were forced to stay inside. So that’s when like the hugest, uh, decrease happens. But that’s something we thought was super interesting. They’re like, I didn’t expect that big of a spike in people looking to like take advantage of those cheap flights. So I feel like, you know, on all of these, I kind of want to give a takeaway too because it’s interesting to look at the data, but it’s also interesting to talk about what we can do in light of it.

So with the traveling industry, I do want to be careful giving too much advice because I know there’s been a lot of layoffs, a lot of furloughs and things like that. So I don’t want to advise doing more when you have fewer resources than ever. But you know, if you do still work in SEO and content for travel, I feel like pivoting to things like informational content like how to get refunds for bookings, which is kinda sad. But that’s what your audience is looking for right now. Updates on travel restrictions, like that type of content is going to be super valuable right now.

Michael King:

Yeah. And to add on that, I think that there’s a lot of confusion about like what places are going to be open when, because some places are starting to reopen now. So getting out ahead of that and being like, Hey, are you trying to figure out when you can go on vacation? And you know, maybe even have an interactive experience. Like, I want to go on vacation on this day. Okay. These countries or these cities of these States are going to be open again so that people can really wrap their head around, you know, where they can actually go. 

Jarrett Thomas:

Totally agree, yep. And so this one is the health industry, so Kameron, I’ll let you go in as well.

Kameron Jenkins:

Yeah. Yeah. So with health obviously like that’s another kind of obvious when we wanted to look at, but we kind of made that a little bit more granular than we used to look at health industries. So we have health media so that sites that are dedicated to publishing like informational medical content, we have health retail. So those are the retailers that sell a ton of things like, you know, hand sanitizer and things like that. We actually broke out respirator masks is like its own segment cause that was interesting on its own. 

And then we also have health services, so that’s actually like doctors and hospital type of websites. One of the biggest spikes which was not super surprising was with retailers obviously who sell health and hygiene. It demands and interests pivoted almost exclusively to things like that. And we from all of the other products that we’re used to selling. I know a couple of people on our search data strategy team, they saw that like the levels of interest in those things exceeded like entire black Friday interest, you know, for this past season.

So it was crazy how much of a spike that was. But one thing we thought was super interesting was there were all these new terms that kind of got created because of this, like toilet paper near me. Which was fascinating because I did not expect that people would be searching something like that. Like toilet paper, you just get the stores or online. But because brick and mortar stores were out of a lot of that stuff, people were trying to find out where they could find out where it was in stock in a store near them.

So I thought that was super interesting, which you can kind of see in the zoomed in chart on the right. So I feel like for SEOs in the health vertical right now, it’s going to be super helpful for them to kind of promote information about Teladoc and things like that. Like people are not like going to the doctor and they should because people know that like all of the noncritical appointments are not being taken. It’s Teladoc. And so like having that type of information like front and center would be really good. 

And I feel like, you know, one thing I failed to mention that I want to mention is that there’s a lot of volatility. It looks like when it comes to people searching for like doctors, which is interesting cause health services, they’re way fewer clicks in that industry. So we wanted to reconcile this to like why is there so much less interest in health services? But doctors’ searches are surging. And we realized that was because of people searching for doctors they saw in the media because of Colgate related stuff. 

So that’s why you’ll see some spikes for certain doctor terms. It’s just because they read an article about a certain doctor and they were just interested in finding out more about them. Um, so that’s kind of the explanation there because that’s what’s really interesting about a lot of the stuff. You see a huge spike or a huge decline and you don’t really know why until you look at the specific keywords that are causing that fluctuation.

Michael King:

And one thing I just wanted to highlight cause you mentioned black Friday and it just popped to my head. I think it was someone that was on like the dev-ops team. They said currently they’re seeing traffic levels on a daily basis that are higher than black Friday. And that just shows how much of a shift that everyone has made behaviorally with respect to like looking for things online and buying them. So the opportunity is obviously huge right now all across the space. 

Kameron Jenkins:

Yeah, absolutely. 

Jarrett Thomas:

Yeah, there’s being able to adjust. Right. And how that affects the consumer behaviors. I think the biggest thing from these slides that I looked at from preparing it with you, just like how our real life affects what we do in the search. Right. And how you absolutely need to adjust to that. Most people just think, Hey, you know, I’ve got these search terms and Hey there are people going to be searching for it. But no, I’m only searching based on what’s happening in my day to day life. And I think that’s the biggest thing.

Kameron Jenkins:

Yup. 100%. 

Jarrett Thomas:

And now we have the service industries.

Kameron Jenkins:

Yeah. So for the services industry, we kind of wanted to look, I mean there are a lot of lines here, but we wanted to look at all of the services industries together to kind of see how those were differing. Like what was surging up or down. Just because you know, obviously people can shop at any time from anywhere thanks to e-commerce, but services are so much different.

I mean there are a lot of service based businesses that rely on in person contact. So we wanted to see kind of how they were being affected by all of this. We saw positive movement with educational services, which makes sense. Restaurant delivery, pet services. Um, legal services was kind of interesting too, because we initially saw like a little dip, but now it’s surging up for very kind of depressing terms like wills and divorces is what we’re seeing there, it is what it is.

We saw a lot of negative movement though for, we already talked about, health services just because people aren’t able to like go see their doctor unless they’re critical right now. So there’s been a drop off there, but also negative movement for job and career. So we wanted to kind of zoom into job and career just because we’re seeing spikes in clicks for things like work from home jobs and jobs and essential services categories like package delivery and grocery stores. 

But what was interesting is that that quickly evolved to people just searching for like jobs in general. So I think at first people were like, Oh, OK, like what’s open right now and how can I get a job in that? But now I think that more and more people are being laid off and furloughed they’re just looking for jobs across the board in general.

So we’re seeing a lot of surge up. But what’s interesting is that what’s surging down still is people searching for things like questions to ask in an interview, which I think kind of indicate that  like demand for jobs is higher than, you know, employer’s ability to hire people right now. So I feel like I thought about this for a little bit and I think like it might be a good idea if you’re in the job and career services sector to create category pages or like articles on topics like companies that are still hiring in midst of COVID, information about how to navigate a layoff or a furlough would be really good. Just anything that will help job seekers with the resources they need to get employed or get financial support right now is I think where the pivot needs to happen.

Jarrett Thomas:

That’s interesting. Yeah. I think the jobs and services is a really interesting one, right? It just shows how before everything was on lockdown, how people are searching for like, Hey, I just need a job. And then the spike in jobs that are essential, I thought that was really, really critical to see too, right? Because most people who want a job, they’re not thinking, Hey, how do I get out there? But now times of dire and they’re like, Hey, I need something right now. I need to pay my bills. I’ve got a family. How do I just get back to work? That was really interesting to see. 

Kameron Jenkins:

Totally. Yeah. 

Jarrett Thomas:

Yep. So, and then essential versus non essential home retail. So I think this is another huge topic, right? So how are most retailers working with this? Right? So how are we shifting from like a home office now that most people are working from home and that type of data. So I’d love to hear your thoughts on that Kameron.

Kameron Jenkins:

Yeah, super interesting. Here, we wanted to look at home retail specifically because we wanted to know if people weren’t just interested in cleaning and sanitizing their home, but we wanted to know, people were interested in furnishing it too with the increased time at home. And that we found to be the case for sure. You know, it’s happening across a few different categories, which I thought was interesting. So there was a pretty sizable spike, like you said, in clicks for things like office desk and office chairs. That obviously coincided with people starting to work from home. They realize they’re set up, they don’t have a home setup or it’s not super comfortable the one they have now. So there was a spike there. 

The spike in sanitizing supplies obviously coincided with the initial COVID-19 concerns, but you also have spikes and things like patio furniture and bedding and like trampolines and stuff too. And the trampolines when I think is really funny because I feel like that’s just a way to keep your kids busy with school closures. And that’s definitely true. Like our neighbors got a trampoline and they use it every day and I think that’s my inclination of how people are using stuff like that. 

But I think the more time we’re all spending at home, the more we’re trying to figure out ways to make that more comfortable for us. So I think for retailers, I would say consider reorganizing maybe some of your category entry points on your homepage or even just creating new category pages, like a work from home essentials category. Just give the people what they want. I mean look at this data and see like how people are shopping right now cause it’s much different than it was before.

Michael King:

Kameron, I’m glad you clarified cause I was like what is a “tramp-line”?

Kameron Jenkins:

Yeah, we have our data analysts that did that and they could be, they could be a lot cleaner, they could be a lot like spiffier, but we totally told each other like done is better than perfect at this point. Like we just want to get this data out. So yeah, trampoline. Not tramp-line. 

Michael King:

No, there’s definitely a call to get a trampoline in my household and I was like, no way.

Jarrett Thomas:

No, I would love to see that with the hospitals. The hospitals, right?

Michael King:

Yeah. I live on the 52nd floor. There’s no way that could work. Well, cool. So, yeah. You know, one of the things that we did on our side was we’re trying to get to the bottom of the same type of idea that you guys are pulling on on the Botify side because we went into this like, okay, you know, tools like jumpshot and hit Hitwise no longer exist. 

So how can we get a sense of what search demand is looking like? And so we worked with advancedwebranking to just pull a lot of data and they ended up making a free tool for this that I would recommend anybody check out and also check out the and Botify trends reports as well that they’re making available. But you know, there’s no real surprises here. You know, all the things that people don’t actually need are seeing large drops.

And the interesting thing is that arts and entertainment was also seeing a large drop in search demand at that time as well. Cause at the end of the day, you know, everybody is actually ramping up on watching things like Netflix and so on and so forth. But I suspect that what we’re seeing is people are just going direct to those channels rather than needing to like search about it as much as they may have before 

And then everything else is again, pretty straight forward. I wish more people were searching for science right now, but of course we’re seeing travel be down dramatically. But at the same time, to Kameron’s point, you know, when we looked at the individual trends of this, we did see an initial spike on traveling.

Again, I think it just maps to what she’s saying. You know, a lot of people are having a lot of confusion, trying to cancel their trips, not knowing what to do and so a big spike, but at the same time it’s not a spike that travel companies can monetize. And so you’re seeing them shrink a lot of their paid search of course. And of course, you know, less going on in their content and so on and so forth.

But I do believe that there’s, this is yielding an opportunity cause if you’re in a position where you can ramp up when everyone else is contracting, you’re going to see impact in the long term once everything recovered.

So what we did is we looked at a few of the individual trends as well on the keyword level and you know, looking at the food and drink industry, we saw basically a reversal, rather than people looking for restaurants near them, they’re looking for food delivery. It’s like basically capitalizing on the previous search demand from people wanting to go out to restaurants that are near them. And then instead I just want everybody to bring their food to them, hopefully they don’t go contact with others, so that we can all get out of this as soon as possible. 

And then, you know, same thing with bars versus alcohol delivery. I’m not too bashful to say that we order from drizzly three times a week cause things are real over here. It’s the same type of idea. You know, people aren’t looking to see what the closest bar is. We want to see how they can get it to come to them and again, contactless. They still want to continue to be able to drink, especially because they felt so overwhelmed right now. 

We also took a look at this with respect to the different streaming platforms and so on. And of course we’re seeing increases for Amazon and Hulu, but nothing is as big as Netflix. So this is an interesting point considering that we just looked at the overarching arts and entertainment trend being down so much. But if you look at these individual streaming networks or channels or whatever you want to call them, we’re seeing that they are continually going up, with Netflix leading the pack in a way that’s just, you know, can’t really match right now. And of course, if you’re a stock owner of Netflix, you are in a good place. 

Online shopping, you know, more and more people are shopping at home. I mean, it’s just the reality of like, you know, you didn’t stockpile and like you were part of a militia. And so now you’ve gotta be a part of this big race to get toilet paper and so on and so forth. But again, you’re also seeing that the individual services are seeing a lot of activity as well.

Jarrett Thomas:

Yep, so restaurant closures, take out versus cooking at home. I know me, I can’t wait to go to the restaurant, I’m tired of doing dishes and cooking.

Kameron Jenkins:

Oh yeah, it was so interesting. I mean this is definitely one we wanted to look at in tandem. These two things. So there’s a huge spike in interest for both cooking at home and restaurant delivery, although the spike is definitely, or was more pronounced with recipes. But what I find hilarious is that we can see that people might be getting sick of cooking at home while delivery is still like canoeing to trend up. 

So we don’t have any specific keywords on these charts yet. But I can tell you that a lot of what we’re seeing initially for recipes is a lot of bread and a lot of alcohol. Delivery is all across the board. I mean there’s all kinds of restaurants that people are looking to order from. But I feel like, you know, for the sites that do create recipes, it definitely looks like interest in cocktails is really high. So that’s something to consider like leaning into.

I can also though, just my gut instinct as to, you know, I can see people starting to feel bad about that pretty soon. Maybe. So maybe start planning for some non alcoholic or juice cleanses or things like that. But there’s definitely been a spike in things like to go margarita is like, that’s not been a thing that we’ve seen before. At least I haven’t. So that’s been super interesting to see.

Michael King:

Yeah. One quick thing on that, you know, some of the other data that we pulled around consumer behavior, in large part, people were just like, yo, I’m letting myself go right now. You know, like, we’re just gonna enjoy the cookies and donuts and all this other stuff. So, yeah, I think to your point, once the world opens back up, we’re going to see such a spike in activity, around like, how do I get in shape, how do I eat better and things like that. So whoever is moving the links for that stuff or building new content for that stuff, it’s going to be the winner right now.

Kameron Jenkins:

Yeah. I agree.

Jarrett Thomas:

I think that’s super interesting based with everything that’s going on with COVID-19 and how they say, you know, underlying health issues that we’re not eating healthy. I just think that’s really interesting.

Kameron Jenkins:

Coping mechanism for sure.

Michael King:

Exactly. It’s like the stress response.

And so at the surprise of no one, home workouts, video conferencing, online learning all up, because there are those of us who in that, when I say us, I don’t mean me cause I’ve not worked out in at least eight weeks, but there are definitely people out there who are keeping their workouts going. You know, looking at this as an opportunity to learn new things. Lots of folks out of jobs and then they’re picking up that skill that they had been wanting to forever and now they’ve got time. And of course we’re all on zoom and Crowdcast and things of that nature at this point.

Kameron Jenkins:

I was just going to say like the stuck home thing is really interesting cause we already looked at home, home retail and stuff. We wanted to see just like general retail across the board, you know, how is that performing? And I don’t think it will surprise anyone. Like luxury is one of those categories that understandably saw the biggest dip there but pretty much everywhere else we’re actually seeing like an increase in just shopping across the board. 

I think because people are bored and they’re just looking for things to do. And I know that’s been true for me. We did have a bit of an issue with our clothing retail category, so I’m bummed it’s not on here, but it was on here a couple days ago. Basically though what we’re seeing from that is that, you know, interest in things like dresses and shoes and purses are going down obviously and clicks on things like joggers and yoga pants are going up.

I mean that’s the thing I feel like doesn’t surprise anyone cause we’re all doing it, but it’s still kind of nice to see it, you know, validated in the data. So I feel like I would have a similar suggestion here as with like the other retail category and is like give the people what they want, make it really easy to find like your lounge wear category clothes from your homepage as well as, you know, make sure you have your lounge wear category pages dialed in, make sure that they’re indexed and things like that and that people can find them easily because that’s definitely where things are still trending.

Yeah. So for this one, it’s definitely interesting to see, again, one of those things that seems kind of obvious, but we just wanted a gut check and we wanted to see if the data was showing the same thing. Like we did see a spike in both internet and streaming categories, although it’s like fairly subtle. It’s not as pronounced as something like travel. We’ll have to see a big contributor to the rise in traffic for at least the internet companies that we were looking at. 

It’s for people looking up speed tests, how to get faster internet and things like that. Obviously we’re all at home and we need, we rely on that and for all of our entertainment or a lot of our entertainment right now, so that’s been a contributor to some of that. The trendline for specific shows is definitely gonna fluctuate based on when things are really stint. When the initial interest of something like Tiger King wears off. Obviously we’re not peak tiger King, but like there’s still interest in that. But you can definitely see that is surging as more people are at home and we’re consuming kind of more content and media than ever. So it’s just kind of like neat to see it validated in the data.

Michael King:

I refuse to watch the Tiger King.

Kameron Jenkins:

I couldn’t, I couldn’t help myself. I had to.

Jarrett Thomas:

I didn’t think I was gonna love it that much.

Kameron Jenkins:

Same here. I got addicted.

Michael King:

There are so many memes and jokes I will never get and I’m fine with it.

Kameron Jenkins: 

And you’re okay with that?

Michael King:

Yeah. Yeah. So we’ve got a couple of minutes left. Let’s just talk through real quick how the channels have changed. So one of the things that we’re seeing in data, this data comes from a bounce exchange. We’re seeing that conversion rates are up 21%. They’re also seeing that traffic is up for a lot of websites as well. And of course it’s going to be limited to the sites that they have in their network. 

But you know, as you might expect, there are more people buying more things online so there’s more opportunity to maximize what you’re doing on your site. We’re also seeing changes in open rates. So I think that, Fajr Muhammad on our team, one of our managers of content strategy, she wrote a blog posts about how people are like very captive audiences and now we’re seeing that reflected on the email side with more people opening and then more people also clicking just in general. 

So you know, if you still think that email is like this channel that doesn’t work, it’s working now even more than ever. And then on the paid side, you know, we’re seeing, CPMs and CPCs being down dramatically. So based on this data from social bakers, it dropped. CPM dropped from $2 to around 81 cents. And if you look in like, uh, you know, other data sets around like, Facebook and also Google ads, we’re seeing those be down like around 50% on average as well.

On the social activity. You know, again, people are just bored and they’re spending a lot more time on TikTok. They’re spending a lot more time on their fitness apps and so on because of the fact that they’re just looking for something to do and they’re looking for ways to stay in shape at home. So a lot of opportunities if you’ve not considered TikTok. I finally downloaded it last weekend cause I was also bored. So yeah, lots of opportunities for brands to consider new channels if they haven’t already been active in them.

So the key thing that I want to highlight is that search is, and this is what we’ve been talking about through this whole discussion really, is that search is still the channel that we get intent from. And being that, everybody’s market segmentation has completely been invalidated during this pandemic. Really understanding what people want through search is the best way to do your marketing right now. You know, the reality is that a lot of people are going to have to ramp down their paid search. Organic search of course, is not as costly. So there’s still a lot of opportunity to leverage tha to be effective in what you’re doing.

Jarrett Thomas:

And yeah. I would like to start with, I know we have some couple of questions, but I think my biggest key takeaway is just the importance of understanding how your consumers are searching right now and how their behavior, the shifts of the pandemic and understanding how key that is to your business success. If you don’t pivot and accommodate to your customers and understand what they’re searching and some of the things they’re looking for and provide the product, you could potentially lose sales and market share. 

So there are still opportunities out there, even though it is a pandemic. There’s still business opportunities. Make sure you’re out there in front of your customers. You guys have anything to add as far as that? That’s my biggest key takeaway.

Kameron Jenkins: 

I think that would be mine too. Honestly. It’s just like there’s no other way really to see, just like to get as good of a window into what your audience is doing right now and interested in right now. So kind of keeping an eye on that on a day to day basis is going to reveal more than just our best guests or you know, keywords we picked a couple of months ago would tell us it’s really cool to see and be surprised by that data.

Michael King:

Yeah, I agree. I think everybody should be spending, you know, quality time looking at the emerging queries that they’re seeing in Google search console. I think that just also looking at how people are using the vocabulary on social, like putting it in some of your keywords, seeing how people are talking about them on Twitter and so on, that’s going to help you really get ahead of what people actually need from your content and your site in general so that you can make sure that you’re servicing all those things in a way that where you’re being a bit more proactive.

Because a lot of our standard keyword research tools aren’t really capable of giving us the real time trends in a way that some of these other things can. So we’ve got like a minute or so left and there’s a couple of questions. So I’m just gonna throw this out and you can, if you want to answer it, good. If not, you know, anyway, we had a client with two businesses that sell doors, one residential, the other commercial, first spiked, second drop. Any hints at the future for commercial building projects?

Kameron Jenkins: 

That’s it. That’s a really good question. I don’t know. It’s really interesting because I don’t know, I don’t think we talked about this one, but we did look at the real estate industry in general. So we did buying homes, renting and we also did construction and it looks like there’s actually like a spike in utilities in the construction industry, which I was surprised by. So it seems like people are still fairly optimistic, which is interesting. 

I know for myself, like we’re moving, so I think like there’s still not as huge of a concern about that kind of thing right now. So I can just go anecdotally based on what I know myself and what I’ve seen on some of our initial data. But yeah, it’ll be interesting to see.

Michael King:

Yeah, I agree with you. I think it may be too early to tell on that one. But the reality of it is the world will open back up and people will continue to build things. So you know, whatever you can do like messaging wise that speaks to what those needs are going to be. If there are new regulations that come from this with respect to how doors need to be put up for security and health and things like that, like getting ahead of that type of content would be valuable. 

Jarrett Thomas:

Absolutely. We have one from YouTube, from Jordan, so it says surprising things like trampolines make sense in hindsight, but when COVID-19 restriction ease up, what kind of surprising searches increases or decreases do you predict we might see?

Michael King:

I mean I have a couple of ideas cause I think that what’s happening right now is new behaviors are coming into play that people are going to have moving forward. I think that, and I keep using this as an example and I think there’s a confluence of things happening that I’m making it clear that this may be true. 

I think movie theaters are going to go away. And the reason why I say so is because one AMC filed for bankruptcy. Two, the trend has been these other types of movie theaters that try to make that experience more like being at home where it’s like, you get food, you get alcohol and your chair goes all the way back. And then the third thing is that because of this pandemic, more and more movie studios have been rolling out movies direct to streaming. And so I think that’s a behavior that’s going to take where people are like, I would prefer to just do this at home and this is going to be a lot less of going to the movies. But what are your thoughts?

Kameron Jenkins: 

I think it’s, it’s really interesting that someone just posted less cooking cause I was going to say something similar. I think like we’re already kind of starting to see that. Like people initially were like, Oh I’m at home. I might as well, you know, I think people are starting to get the go back already.

Michael King:

Cool. Alright, last question since we’re in overtime, are there any standout shifts in B2B verticals?

Kameron Jenkins: 

You know, what’s interesting is we don’t have a ton of B2B data, but I could just like anecdotally from our own data and what we’re seeing as well as like we do have a couple of other B2B things we were looking into and we didn’t actually, I was surprised we didn’t see as much volatility as we thought we would. I think one of those things I initially had assumed like, Oh people will cut like their technology and stuff before they cut people.

But I think like across the board everything has been evaluated, like kind of on an equal playing field. And it also depends on what type of technology you use. I think some people with less resources probably need to supplement with more technology cause it’s cheaper. So it really, I think depends on what kind of B2B you’re in. Obviously that’s such a huge sector, but at least like from the technology and software standpoint, I think it surprised me to see that. I think like, yeah, maybe people are investing more in tools right now potentially because they have like fewer head counts.

Michael King:

Okay. Yeah, I agree with that. I also think that for the most part, a lot of B2B companies are still business as usual. And I don’t mean that they aren’t making cuts, everyone’s making cuts, but like they’re still needing to do what it is that they do. And so there’s still a lot of work out there for B2B companies and there’s still the need for whatever that service or that product is. And so you may not, you may see a little less demand and they may want to know how you can still support them during a pandemic. But beyond that, I think it’s like they’re still, you know, doing what they need to do. So yeah, that’s it.

Jarrett Thomas:

Well, just want to say thank you to all that join. And also Kameron, thank you for joining us, our first guest on Atomic SEO. You were phenomenal. We really appreciate all the work you’ve done and the data you had.

Kameron Jenkins: 

Yeah. Thanks so much for having me. It was a blast.

Jarrett Thomas:

Absolutely love that. You know we’d love to do this again sometime. Mike, appreciate you as always, for all those watching. Thank you for joining again. Thank you for tuning in. We will be doing this every other week so you can expect the next one to come on May 15th we’ll have some more guests and next week we’ll be doing Rankable. 

So for those who are interested in growing their social presence, how to attack LinkedIn, how to drive more leads via LinkedIn, how to be creating a video to drive more leads as well, we’ll be covering that. So that’s gonna be really exciting. I’ll have some links off of that. Thank you for joining us. We really appreciate the support guys. Have a great weekend. Happy Friday, and stay safe out there, alright?

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